My name is Mason, I'm twenty. I do things and I talk to people. You might like the things I say if you talk to me. I live an odd life.

 

I sign a lease tomorrow! Hello new home

0wenhart:

I’m 14 years old and i listen to led zeppelin only. only the band Led , zeppelin. i will liste off the albums released by led zeppelin, i am only 14 years but i can do this, becausei  listen to “led zeppelin”. led zellpelin 1, led zepellin 2, 3, 4, houses of the holy, led zeppelin, this band i know but i am 14. Led zeppelin is a band i listen to but i am much younger than other people who listen to led zeppelin. 14 years old

futureofscience:

Restoring Order in the Brain
"Alzheimer’s disease is the most widespread degenerative neurological disorder in the world. Over five million Americans live with it, and one in three senior citizens will die with the disease or a similar form of dementia. While memory loss is a common symptom of Alzheimer’s, other behavioral manifestations — depression, loss of inhibition, delusions, agitation, anxiety, and aggression — can be even more challenging for victims and their families to live with.
Now Prof. Daniel Offen and Dr. Adi Shruster of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine have discovered that by reestablishing a population of new cells in the part of the brain associated with behavior, some symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease significantly decreased or were reversed altogether.
The research, published in the journal Behavioural Brain Research, was conducted on mouse models; it provides a promising target for Alzheimer’s symptoms in human beings as well.
"Until 15 years ago, the common belief was that you were born with a finite number of neurons. You would lose them as you aged or as the result of injury or disease," said Prof. Offen, who also serves as Chief Scientific Officer at BrainStorm, a biotech company at the forefront of innovative stem cell research. "We now know that stem cells can be used to regenerate areas of the brain.""

futureofscience:

Restoring Order in the Brain

"Alzheimer’s disease is the most widespread degenerative neurological disorder in the world. Over five million Americans live with it, and one in three senior citizens will die with the disease or a similar form of dementia. While memory loss is a common symptom of Alzheimer’s, other behavioral manifestations — depression, loss of inhibition, delusions, agitation, anxiety, and aggression — can be even more challenging for victims and their families to live with.

Now Prof. Daniel Offen and Dr. Adi Shruster of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine have discovered that by reestablishing a population of new cells in the part of the brain associated with behavior, some symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease significantly decreased or were reversed altogether.

The research, published in the journal Behavioural Brain Research, was conducted on mouse models; it provides a promising target for Alzheimer’s symptoms in human beings as well.

"Until 15 years ago, the common belief was that you were born with a finite number of neurons. You would lose them as you aged or as the result of injury or disease," said Prof. Offen, who also serves as Chief Scientific Officer at BrainStorm, a biotech company at the forefront of innovative stem cell research. "We now know that stem cells can be used to regenerate areas of the brain.""